Archive for April, 2012


 

PlayStation 3The powerful processors in Sony’s PlayStation 3 gaming console now have another use: cracking passwords.

New Zealand-based security researcher Nick Breese claims to have used the year-old gaming console to crack passwords at speeds 100 times greater than Intel hardware is capable of. Breese, a security consultant with Security-Assessment.com, presented his findings to the Kiwicon hacker conference in Wellington, New Zealand.

Breese, who has been working on the project, called “Crackstation”, for the past six months, used the Sony PlayStation 3 gaming console for his break-through research. PS3’s Cell Broadband Engine technology was created by IBM, Toshiba and Sony. The companies collaborated to create the CBE, commonly known as Cell, processor, which consists of one scalar processor and eight vector processors.

PS3s are useful for “brute force” hacking, which simply tries all possible combinations for a password until it hits the right one. A network of PS3s can crack an eight-character password in a few days, whereas other computers might take weeks. Higher-end computers can achieve the same result, but, Breese points out, cost a great deal more and aren’t readily available on a Toys R Us shelf.

PlayStation 3 can also be used to break basic encryption schemes, Breese says, although widely used ciphers such as the 128-bit Secure Sockets Layer (SSL), used to protect online banking transactions, remain safe. “It’ll speed up the attacks but I can’t see that it’s broken,” he says. “(It) is still safe because the people implementing the ciphers foresaw CPU power rapidly increasing.”

 

Google plans to release smart glasses that will give help users see where they are and where they need to go.

As per many reports, Google is expected to start selling eyeglasses that will project information, entertainment and, this being a Google product, advertisements onto the lenses. These glasses will have the combined features of virtual reality and augmented reality.

The Google Glasses can use a 4G cell connection to pull in information from Google’s mountain of data and display info about the real world in augmented reality on the lens in front of your eye. As you turn your head you’ll get information about your surroundings and nearby objects from Google Goggles, info on buildings and establishments from Google Maps, even your friends’ nearby check-ins from Latitude. The company has no plans to sell ads into your newly augmented view of the world, but will consider it if the product really catches on.

The glasses are not being designed to be worn constantly — although Google engineers expect some users will wear them a lot — but will be more like smartphones, used when needed, with the lenses serving as a kind of see-through computer monitor.

Google glasses are basically wearable computers, that will use the same Android software that powers Android smartphones and tablets. Like smartphones and tablets, the glasses will be equipped with GPS and motion sensors. They will also contain a camera and audio inputs and outputs.

Several people who have seen the glasses, but who are not allowed to speak publicly about them, said that the location information was a major feature of the glasses. Through the built-in camera on the glasses, Google will be able to stream images to its rack computers and return augmented reality information to the person wearing them. For instance, a person looking at a landmark could see detailed historical information and comments about it left by friends. If facial recognition software becomes accurate enough, the glasses could remind a wearer of when and how he met the vaguely familiar person standing in front of him at a party. They might also be used for virtual reality games that use the real world as the playground.

The expectation is that we will get a really cool demonstration of this technology at Google I/O in June.

Google glasses

 

Intel has officially launched the first wave of its Ivy Bridge processors with a new tri-gate transistor technology, touting the new chips as the “world’s first 22 nanometer product.”

Intel’s new Ivy Bridge processors use a new tri-gate transistor technology to boost processing power while reducing the amount of energy needed.

Traditional planar chip design (left) and Intel’s new Tri-Gate technology (right).

The initial release includes 13 quad-core processors, most of which will be targeted at desktop computers.

Further dual core processors, suitable for ultrabooks – thin laptops – will be announced “later this spring”.

Intel and PC manufacturers expect the release to drive a wave of new sales.

frnds and viewers of technosid i will so u this report next day in technosida2vi.wordpress.com

vik,z

<script type=”text/javascript”><!–
google_ad_client = “pub-X”;
google_ad_width = 120;
google_ad_height = 600;
google_ad_format = “120x600_as”;
google_ad_type = “text_image”;
google_ad_channel =””;
//–></script>
<script type=”text/javascript”
  src=”http://pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/show_ads.js”&gt;
</script>